brightcopperpenny
tamorapierce
Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.
Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)
pbsthisdayinhistory
pbsthisdayinhistory:

May 21, 1932: Amelia Earhart Breaks Records
On this day in 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She departed from Newfoundland and landed in a pasture in Northern Ireland.
Amelia Earhart may have been the most well-known woman pilot of her time, but she was neither the first nor the last to achieve great heights in the world of American Aviation. Check out American Experience's “Women in Flight” photo gallery for more.
Photo: Amelia Earhart, c. 1928 (Library of Congress)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

May 21, 1932: Amelia Earhart Breaks Records

On this day in 1932, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She departed from Newfoundland and landed in a pasture in Northern Ireland.

Amelia Earhart may have been the most well-known woman pilot of her time, but she was neither the first nor the last to achieve great heights in the world of American Aviation. Check out American Experience's “Women in Flight” photo gallery for more.

Photo: Amelia Earhart, c. 1928 (Library of Congress)

Did you know that while at Princeton, Sonia Sotomayor worked in a computer center running programs with punchcards? She even had the idea of writing her thesis using punch cards so that when she made edits, she wouldn’t have to retype the entire paper! That predates the existence, or at least the use, of any word processor program.
Associate Justice on the Supreme Court and a technological pioneer too! Who knew?
You can read more about Sonia Sotomayor’s college days in her book My Beloved World.
Photo Courtesty of Princeton University

Did you know that while at Princeton, Sonia Sotomayor worked in a computer center running programs with punchcards? She even had the idea of writing her thesis using punch cards so that when she made edits, she wouldn’t have to retype the entire paper! That predates the existence, or at least the use, of any word processor program.

Associate Justice on the Supreme Court and a technological pioneer too! Who knew?

You can read more about Sonia Sotomayor’s college days in her book My Beloved World.

Photo Courtesty of Princeton University

scienceing

note-a-bear:

thejunglenook:

sci-universe:

A toast to these great astronomers!

Read about Annie Jump Cannon, Henrietta Swan Leavitt, and Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin

Wine and honoring women in science.
Cosmos doing science education right.

I keep meaning to add, because no one seems to mention it: both Annie Jump Cannon and Henrietta Swan Leavitt were both Deaf.

I feel like it’s important to acknowledge that part of their histories, because I don’t often see folks talking about disability history wrt science stuffs (without having to look for it), and it’s even more rare to see it wrt women in science.

minuiko
rkirkman:

tarteauxfraises:

kendrajbean:

In the mid-1930s, an Australian journalist visited Germany to report on the rise of fascism and interview Adolf Hitler. The atrocities she saw there, which included the public beating of Jews, forever changed the course of her young life. Nancy Wake, who died Sunday at age 98, would spend World War II fighting Nazism tooth and nail, saving thousands of Allied lives, winding up at the top of the Gestapo’s most-wanted list and ultimately receiving more decorations than any other servicewoman.
Wake made her way from Spain to Britain, where she convinced special agents to train her as a spy and guerilla operative. In April 1944 she parachuted into France to coordinate attacks on German troops and installations prior to the D-Day invasion, leading a band of 7,000 resistance fighters. In order to earn the esteem of the men under her command, she reportedly challenged them to drinking contests and would inevitably drink them under the table. But her fierceness alone may have won her enough respect: During the violent months preceding the liberation of Paris, Wake killed a German guard with a single karate chop to the neck, executed a women who had been spying for the Germans, shot her way out of roadblocks and biked 70 hours through perilous Nazi checkpoints to deliver radio codes for the Allies. (via)



Nancy Wake has been a hero of mine for ages, a phenomenal woman

rkirkman:

tarteauxfraises:

kendrajbean:

In the mid-1930s, an Australian journalist visited Germany to report on the rise of fascism and interview Adolf Hitler. The atrocities she saw there, which included the public beating of Jews, forever changed the course of her young life. Nancy Wake, who died Sunday at age 98, would spend World War II fighting Nazism tooth and nail, saving thousands of Allied lives, winding up at the top of the Gestapo’s most-wanted list and ultimately receiving more decorations than any other servicewoman.

Wake made her way from Spain to Britain, where she convinced special agents to train her as a spy and guerilla operative. In April 1944 she parachuted into France to coordinate attacks on German troops and installations prior to the D-Day invasion, leading a band of 7,000 resistance fighters. In order to earn the esteem of the men under her command, she reportedly challenged them to drinking contests and would inevitably drink them under the table. But her fierceness alone may have won her enough respect: During the violent months preceding the liberation of Paris, Wake killed a German guard with a single karate chop to the neck, executed a women who had been spying for the Germans, shot her way out of roadblocks and biked 70 hours through perilous Nazi checkpoints to deliver radio codes for the Allies. (via)

Nancy Wake has been a hero of mine for ages, a phenomenal woman

supercrazypurplegirl

mslorelei:

Four African teenage girls have invented a urine-powered generator. This is a huge accomplishment and could change life in remote areas all over the world.

thefontnazi:

japesofwrath:

howiviewafrica:

A Urine Powered Generator. An amazing accomplishment by four brilliant girls. The girls are are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15).
 
 
  • 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity.

  • The system works like this:

    • Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which separates out the hydrogen.
    • The hydrogen goes into a water filter for purification, which then gets pushed into the gas cylinder.
    • The gas cylinder pushes hydrogen into a cylinder of liquid borax, which is used to remove the moisture from the hydrogen gas.
    • This purified hydrogen gas is pushed into the generator.

This is amazing. Give them a billion dollars right now. They may have just saved the planet. 

folks are doing a PISS poor job of reblogging this.