foxwmulder
oldfilmsflicker:

Okay guys, I spent my entire Friday night combing through Netflix and compiling this handy dandy list (with links!) to 100 films directed by women that you can watch RIGHT NOW. Quite a few of these I haven’t even seen myself! There’s comedies and dramas and romances and horror and action and documentary and foreign and Oscar winners and Razzie winners (maybe?) and pretty much anything you could want to watch. I’m sure there are more films by women on the service (100 out of thousands is a good way of hitting the 12% of films stat right on home though). Anyways, enjoy!
14 Women
2 Days in Paris
2 Days in New York
28 Days
A League of Their Own
Adore
Aeon Flux
After the Wedding
Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry
American Psycho
And While We Were Here
Bastards
Bedrooms and Hallways
Blackfish
Blindsight
Boys Don’t Cry
The Boys Next Door
The Brady Bunch Movie
Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason
Camilla
Carolina
Cherry Blossoms
Children of a Lesser God
Clueless
Committed
Control Room
Countdown to Zero
The Countess
Der Wald Vor Lauter Baumen (Forest For the Trees)
Desert Hearts
Die Friseuse (The Hairdresser)
Dragstrip Girl
Elegy
Fish Tank
For Ellen
Friends With Kids
Goodbye First Love
The Guilt Trip
Holy Smoke
Home
The Hot Flashes
In Between Days
In the Land of Blood and Honey
The Iron Lady
The Kids Are All Right
La Teta Asustada (The Milk of Sorrow)
Last Call at the Oasis
Life Happens
A Little Bit of Heaven
Look Who’s Talking
Look Who’s Talking Too
Lore
Lost in Translation
Love Serenade
Madeinusa
The Man Who Cried
Me and You and Everyone You Know
Movern Callar
The Moth Diaries
My Brilliant Career
Nowhere Boy
Nuyorican Dream
Old Joy
The Peacemaker
Peeples
The Piano
Ping Pong Playa
Plush
Priest
The Prince of Tides
Protagonist
Puccini For Beginners
The Punk Singer
The Queen of Versailles
Ravenous
Riding in Cars with Boys
The Selfish Giant
Shades of Fear
SherryBaby
Sister
Sleeping Beauty
Something’s Gotta Give
Somewhere
The Square
Strange Days
The Taste of Others
Things Behind the Sun
Tiny Furniture
Tomboy
Touchy Feely
Trois Mondes (Three Worlds)
Una Noche
Union Square
Variety
Vinter’s Luck (A Heavenly Vintage)
The Virgin Suicides
Walking and Talking
Waste Land
Water Lilies
The Weight of Water

oldfilmsflicker:

Okay guys, I spent my entire Friday night combing through Netflix and compiling this handy dandy list (with links!) to 100 films directed by women that you can watch RIGHT NOW. Quite a few of these I haven’t even seen myself! There’s comedies and dramas and romances and horror and action and documentary and foreign and Oscar winners and Razzie winners (maybe?) and pretty much anything you could want to watch. I’m sure there are more films by women on the service (100 out of thousands is a good way of hitting the 12% of films stat right on home though). Anyways, enjoy!

  1. 14 Women
  2. 2 Days in Paris
  3. 2 Days in New York
  4. 28 Days
  5. A League of Their Own
  6. Adore
  7. Aeon Flux
  8. After the Wedding
  9. Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry
  10. American Psycho
  11. And While We Were Here
  12. Bastards
  13. Bedrooms and Hallways
  14. Blackfish
  15. Blindsight
  16. Boys Don’t Cry
  17. The Boys Next Door
  18. The Brady Bunch Movie
  19. Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason
  20. Camilla
  21. Carolina
  22. Cherry Blossoms
  23. Children of a Lesser God
  24. Clueless
  25. Committed
  26. Control Room
  27. Countdown to Zero
  28. The Countess
  29. Der Wald Vor Lauter Baumen (Forest For the Trees)
  30. Desert Hearts
  31. Die Friseuse (The Hairdresser)
  32. Dragstrip Girl
  33. Elegy
  34. Fish Tank
  35. For Ellen
  36. Friends With Kids
  37. Goodbye First Love
  38. The Guilt Trip
  39. Holy Smoke
  40. Home
  41. The Hot Flashes
  42. In Between Days
  43. In the Land of Blood and Honey
  44. The Iron Lady
  45. The Kids Are All Right
  46. La Teta Asustada (The Milk of Sorrow)
  47. Last Call at the Oasis
  48. Life Happens
  49. A Little Bit of Heaven
  50. Look Who’s Talking
  51. Look Who’s Talking Too
  52. Lore
  53. Lost in Translation
  54. Love Serenade
  55. Madeinusa
  56. The Man Who Cried
  57. Me and You and Everyone You Know
  58. Movern Callar
  59. The Moth Diaries
  60. My Brilliant Career
  61. Nowhere Boy
  62. Nuyorican Dream
  63. Old Joy
  64. The Peacemaker
  65. Peeples
  66. The Piano
  67. Ping Pong Playa
  68. Plush
  69. Priest
  70. The Prince of Tides
  71. Protagonist
  72. Puccini For Beginners
  73. The Punk Singer
  74. The Queen of Versailles
  75. Ravenous
  76. Riding in Cars with Boys
  77. The Selfish Giant
  78. Shades of Fear
  79. SherryBaby
  80. Sister
  81. Sleeping Beauty
  82. Something’s Gotta Give
  83. Somewhere
  84. The Square
  85. Strange Days
  86. The Taste of Others
  87. Things Behind the Sun
  88. Tiny Furniture
  89. Tomboy
  90. Touchy Feely
  91. Trois Mondes (Three Worlds)
  92. Una Noche
  93. Union Square
  94. Variety
  95. Vinter’s Luck (A Heavenly Vintage)
  96. The Virgin Suicides
  97. Walking and Talking
  98. Waste Land
  99. Water Lilies
  100. The Weight of Water
ladyshinga
brodingershat:

sarahanndippity:

yellowis4happy:

applepiemonster:

lierdumoa:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

The woman who made your Wifi working.
Hedy Lamarr was an Austrian-born American actress. Max Reinhardt called her the “most beautiful woman in Europe” due to her “strikingly dark exotic looks”.
Mathematically talented, Lamarr came up with an early technique for spread spectrum communications and frequency hopping, necessary for wireless communication from the pre-computer age to the present day.

OMG I read a BUST article on this woman like a year ago. She was SO COOL. She was like, “Damnit, no one in the government will hire me to invent shit. FINE. I WILL MARRY FELLOW INVENTOR WITH GOVERNMENT CONNECTIONS AND DO MY OWN RESEARCH. Oh shit. How am I going to pay for my own research? What can I do that doesn’t take up too much of my time and pays me lots of money? OH, I GUESS I’LL JUST BE A FAMOUS ACTRESS. IF I HAVE TO BE.”

guys i found this on the wiki page

According to Anne Hathaway, the Catwoman portrayal in 2012’s film the Dark Knight Rises is based on Hedy Lamarr.

I guess i found the topic for my next english presentation

Um, wow. Found my new hero. And here I’d only heard about her in the context of her acting. That is not okay.

the dream

Casually dropping this here because this is one of the coolest babes in history.

brodingershat:

sarahanndippity:

yellowis4happy:

applepiemonster:

lierdumoa:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

The woman who made your Wifi working.

Hedy Lamarr was an Austrian-born American actress. Max Reinhardt called her the “most beautiful woman in Europe” due to her “strikingly dark exotic looks”.

Mathematically talented, Lamarr came up with an early technique for spread spectrum communications and frequency hopping, necessary for wireless communication from the pre-computer age to the present day.

OMG I read a BUST article on this woman like a year ago. She was SO COOL. She was like, “Damnit, no one in the government will hire me to invent shit. FINE. I WILL MARRY FELLOW INVENTOR WITH GOVERNMENT CONNECTIONS AND DO MY OWN RESEARCH. Oh shit. How am I going to pay for my own research? What can I do that doesn’t take up too much of my time and pays me lots of money? OH, I GUESS I’LL JUST BE A FAMOUS ACTRESS. IF I HAVE TO BE.”

guys i found this on the wiki page

According to Anne Hathaway, the Catwoman portrayal in 2012’s film the Dark Knight Rises is based on Hedy Lamarr.

I guess i found the topic for my next english presentation

Um, wow. Found my new hero. And here I’d only heard about her in the context of her acting. That is not okay.

the dream

Casually dropping this here because this is one of the coolest babes in history.

mypocketshurt90
mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.
In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 
I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like


I LOVE IT

mermaidskey:

hemipelagicdredger:

mermaidskey:

mermaidskey:

oxidoreductase:

Lavoisier is having none of your shit.

Heeeey so fun fact: the woman in that painting is Lavoisier’s wife, Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze, who not only acted as Lavoisier’s lab assistant but also translated English and Latin texts into French so he could read them. But she didn’t just translate, she pointed out errors in the chemistry in some of the texts. Her observations of these errors convinced Lavoisier to study combustion, which led to his discovery of oxygen. She was also critical to the publication of Lavoisier’s Elementary Treatise on Chemistry in 1789. She kept strict records of every experiment they conducted together and drew detailed diagrams of all their equipment. She also threw amazing parties and invited all the brightest minds in science so her husband could pick their brains. After Lavoisier was guillotined she secured all of his notebooks and equipment for posterity.

In short: NOBODY KICKS MADAME LAVOISIER OUT OF THE LAB.

Also, a side note: My historian husband-to-be pointed some things out to me about this painting. Notice that Madame Lavoisier is looking at the viewer, and all the light is on her, while Lavoisier himself is physically smaller than her, in shadow, and looking up to her in reverence. This isn’t a candid photograph- all of these choices are deliberate. The painting isn’t of Lavoisier- Madame Lavoisier is meant to be the central subject. 

I can just imagine Lavoisier telling all his colleagues that his wife is really the one with all the clever ideas, and them patting him on the back and telling him he’s sweet for saying so.

more like

image

I LOVE IT

msjayjustice
soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis
Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris
Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.
The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.
She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

soulbrotherv2:

An African Princess Who Stood Unafraid Among Nazis

Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now.

By Jenee Desmond-Harris

Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.

The book follows Massaquoi, born the daughter of the King of Gallinas of Southern Sierra Leone in 1904, to Liberia, Nazi Germany and the segregated American South, where she wrote her memoirs while enrolled at Tennessee’s Fisk University.

She died in 1978, and her story could have died with her.  [Continue reading complete article at The Root.]

brightcopperpenny